PostgreSQL vs MySQL

Have you ever wondered why you should choose one open source database over another? What features would make the most sense for your Organization? Maybe you’re a developer looking to learn a database and can’t choose where to start?

The folks at PostgreSQL have put together a wiki, Why PostgreSQL instead of MySQL. It’s, by no means, complete at this time but it is a good start.

The wiki is not editable by the public but it is open for reading. The wiki entry compares PostgreSQL 8.1 and MySQL 5.0.

Some of the points raised are:

  • Data Integrity – MySQL has improved with a “strict mode”
  • Database Engine Core – No comparison is complete without a bit of FUD: “It is worth observing that the database engine is part of the core of PostgreSQL, whereas InnoDB is a dual-licensed product currently licensed from Oracle Corporation. It’s uncertain how Oracle may alter InnoDB in the future as they act in competition with MySQL AB, whereas PostgreSQL has no such conflict of interest.”
  • Speed – MySQL is faster but PostgreSQL is narrowing the gap
  • Application Portability – sparse now but hopefully will grow

I hope this is frequently updated by the PostgreSQL community. It will make a great resource.

It would be nice if the people at the PostgreSQL.org website would give a few MySQL developers write access to enter counterpoints to the details in the wiki. An alternative would be for MySQL to answer with their own wiki.

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1 Comment »

 
  • Roland Bouman says:

    “It would be nice if the people at the PostgreSQL.org website would give a few MySQL developers write access to enter counterpoints to the details in the wiki. An alternative would be for MySQL to answer with their own wiki.”

    I think these comparisons would be most interesting if they would be made by customers/users that are not formally attached to either organizations behind the respective products yet are experienced in both.

    kind regards,

    Roland Bouman
    http://rpbouman.blogspot.com/